Archives / 1990 Sundance Film Festival

Roger and Me

Director: Michael Moore

Institute History

  • 1990 Sundance Film Festival

Description

Roger and Me is an extraordinary film: powerful, original, joyfully naive and, somehow, very, very funny. What happens to Flint. Michigan when General Motors shuts down eleven factories and eliminates thirty thousand jobs? Michael Moore, maverick journalist and first-time filmmaker, returned home to find out. The thriving city he once called home is decimated: thousands are out of work, businesses have shut down, families are being evicted, and crime is skyrocketing. In their wisdom, the city fathers try various boondoggle schemes to revive the people's spirits-building an Autoworld and a new Hyatt hotel, even visits by Ronald Reagan, Pat Boone, Anita Bryant and Bob Eubanks.

The clever narrative quest of this first-person documentary is Moore's own hilarious attempts to meet Roger Smith, head of General Motors, and bring him to Flint to witness the ruin his company has wrought. In the footsteps of someone as prototypically American as Mark Twain, Moore assumes an ironic attitude toward his own self-importance, without ever dulling his sense of purpose and justice.


Sunday, January 217:00pm
Egyptian Theatre

Monday, January 2210:00 a.m.
Prospector Square Theatre

$10.00

— Tony Safford

Screening Details

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