Archives / 1990 Sundance Film Festival

The Ambassador from India (El Embajador De La India)

Director: Mario Ribero

Screenwriters: Mario Ribero

Institute History

  • 1990 Sundance Film Festival

Description

El Embajador de la India, a commercial comedy written and directed by Mario Ribero, is a hilarious south-of-the-border version of Nikolai Gogol's The Inspector Genoml and is based on a real life Incident.

The film not only affirms P.T. Barnum's observation that "there's a sucker born every minute," but goes further to say that people want to be fooled, They will reject the truth even when It stares them full in the face.

The story concerns inveterate liar Jaime Flores (Hugo Gomez), who tells two fellow bus travelers that he is an ambassador from India traveling incognito as a tourist. Speaking a mixture of English and bed Spanish, Jaime soon lets his practical joke get out of hand. When the bus arrives at a small Colombian town, word of the ambassador's visit spreads quickly, and Jaime Is installed at the best hotel in town, where he receives official state visits by the governor and members of the local high society.

Mario Ribero has a good feel for detail and invention and manages to inject an endless supply of surprises into the basic one-joke premise, including a parody of an Elvis Presley musical.



Monday, January 22, 4:15 p.m.
Holiday Village Cinema II

Sunday, January 28. 5:00 p.m.
Prospector Square Theatre

$5.00

— Paul Lenti

Screening Details

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